Guest Book

  1. 2015.05.27 17:58 edit & del reply

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  2. 2015.05.20 17:40 edit & del reply

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  3. yclvqenel 2014.08.25 18:34 신고 edit & del reply

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    In the biggest picture of the food web we can draw, it always seems to center on our likes and dislikes. That s even considering the amount of money marketing companies spend on developing slogans and generating buzz. We still have a certain amount of influence to exert on the market.<br>
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    The big ship of big food can be steered into icebergs, turned away from safe havens and even scuttled entirely if we steadfastly refuse to eat purple cereal or olestra-laden chips. Where those companies make their money now are in the gray areas of 鈥渘atural鈥?or 鈥渙rganic,鈥?鈥渓ocal鈥?and/or 鈥渇resh.鈥?br>
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    Processing has started to take on the taint it rightfully should have, and we are still up in the air about additives. I bring this up not to bash the marketing companies or big food but to once again highlight the concept of choice. This continues to be a growing issue because of the social awareness raised internationally, awareness that covers all facets of food, diet, sustainable farming, renewable resources, land use, water use, you get the picture. Just about everything we interact with now connects in some way with food and our choices.<br>
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    Check out the recipes below for corn the way it should be. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)
    It wasn鈥檛 always so; food was once something we ate and enjoyed, not fought over or fought through on a daily basis. Where once we were sold on the idea that the new age would give us infinite choices, we were also plunged into this dark wonderland where there are choices, though many, led to more choices or in some cases bad choices. This led to more discussion, clouding the central theme that food is good, good food is minimally processed and some of the best food comes from the farm down the road.<br>
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    Perhaps no food has suffered this change more than corn, with its byproduct high-fructose corn syrup now playing the role of evil antagonist in recent books and even a movie or two. From a simple wild grass, grown and collected from the midlands of Central America, to the villain behind obesity, this grain has lost its luster.<br>
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    It dawned on me just how far corn had fallen when I spied a soft drink that advertised itself as sweetened with cane sugar. If corn is Lord Voldemort, then cane sugar was once Darth Vader responsible for the destruction of the peaceful planet of me.<br>
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    Pepsi, with its eye on the prize has announced that it will replace high-fructose corn syrup with 鈥渞eal sugar.鈥?But in a reverse twist that only Twilight Zone fans could appreciate, Mexican Coca Cola has announced right back that it is thinking of cutting costs by substituting high-fructose corn syrup for the cane sugar. (The Mexican government suggests that it would happily step in at that point and levy a 鈥渏unk food tax鈥?on the soda).<br>
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    Weird stuff I know, and very hurtful to the proud heritage of corn in this country. One of the earliest grains to cultivate, it fed our growing nation in fresh, dried, smoked and liquid forms. It was a measure of currency, ballast on river boats and a method used by settlers moving west to co-opt land once controlled by the Native Americans.<br>
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    Corn was easy to hybridize, and soon varieties that were more tender and sweet began to outstrip the 鈥渇ield corn.鈥?When corn potential was finally unlocked, when we found we could make just about anything out of the grain and use it as the first four ingredients of a processed food, the genie was out of the bottle.<br>
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    All of this is well-documented and, while it may bear repeating, it will remain a key cog in food until such time as the big food execs and Madison Avenue deem it otherwise or we figure the food web out.<br>
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    My main point in digging this all up again is to remind you that corn is still good; fresh corn is great, grits are versatile and filling, and polenta to me is a building block of Northern Italian cooking. So get your corn the old-fashioned way; shuck some fresh corn, mx up a pot of grits or polenta, let it chill, and crisp it in olive oil and serve it with fresh tomatoes and basil. Re-discover the joy of popcorn, not in a microwave but over a campfire or kitchen stove.<br>
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    That鈥檚 the way corn should be, always and forever. Here are a few recipes to get you started.<br>
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    Grilled corn with compound butter<br>
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    Take the ears of corn, de-silk and rewrap with the outer leaves. Soak the corn in water for about 30 minutes, shake the excess water off and place on the grill. Let the leaves darken but not burn, make sure the corn stays tightly wrapped, and if your heat is consistent you should have grilled corn in less than 15 minutes.<br>
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    Compound butter<br>
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    1 pound unsalted butter softened to room temperature<br>
    1 teaspoon chopped shallot<br>
    陆 teaspoon minced garlic<br>
    1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon<br>
    陆 serrano diced<br>
    Salt and pepper to taste<br>
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    Whip the ingredients into the softened butter until it is completely combined, roll up the butter into a cylinder and then chill it to firm. You can add the butter before you grill, or you can slice and spread on the corn once it is done.<br>
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    Grits and greens<br>
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    I like to use grits as a base for cooked greens or green beans. It is one of the best ways to sop up the juices of a properly cooked green or give texture to southern-braised green beans. Both often have bacon or jowl in them, so do not duplicate that in the cooking of the grits.<br>
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    Start with 1 part grits to 3 parts water or water and milk. Bring the liquid to a low boil, add the grits and stir consistently until they start to thicken. This step will be fairly quick, but the actual cooking will take longer.<br>
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    Cook the grits slowly until they are tender, they should never break down to mush. When finished, season with salt and pepper and add some fresh goat cheese for a bit of sharpness and tang. Ladle the greens or the bean over the top and enjoy.<br>
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    Crisp polenta with tomato basil (sauce)<br>
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    The cooking of the polenta is very similar to grits, but the grain will be fine so the process will be faster. We want the end product to be fairly thick, so you may start with a 1-to-2 parts. Once the polenta is cooked season with salt and pepper and spread evenly into a pie pan. Chill overnight and then slice into wedges<br>
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    The sauce can be freshly done or cooked on a grill or in a saut茅 pan using:<br>
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    Tomatoes- 3-4 large, cored and diced<br>
    Candy onions- 1 large sliced from tip to root<br>
    Young garlic- 3-4 cloves crushed and chopped<br>
    Fresh basil to taste<br>
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    Add everything into a saut茅 pan with some good olive oil and warm slowly until the onion and garlic soften, the tomato breaks down and the juice starts to collect. Add the basil to order, season with salt and pepper, and spoon over the wedge of polenta that has been crisped in hot olive oil and some truffle salt. Grilled tomatoes added to the mix provide a nice smokiness for the dish.<br>
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    John Foster is an executive chef who heads the culinary program at Sullivan University鈥檚 Lexington campus. A New York native, Chef Foster has been active in the Lexington culinary scene for more than 20 years. The French Culinary Institute-trained chef has been an executive chef, including at the popular Dudley鈥檚 Restaurant, and a restaurant owner.<br>
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  4. 2014.06.12 09:56 edit & del reply

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  5. 구눈 2013.09.29 19:37 신고 edit & del reply

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